Wednesday, December 21, 2011

Former professor of liturgy at St. Francis Seminary rips corrected translation

As a former professor of liturgy at St. Francis Seminary who trained many of the priests of Milwaukee Archdiocese, I deplore the English translation of the Roman Missal that has been foisted upon American Catholics.  [That is important to remember.  Terrible professors taught so many priests about the liturgy.  They were never exposed to the beauty and transcendence that any Catholic let alone a priest should be taught.]
By a very slavish translation of Latin, these texts have brought us as close as possible to the way Romans prayed between 500 and 1000 A.D., together with the social and cultural baggage of that time. [Like God and sin and judgement?] The spiritual universe of those Roman times is there, along with an almost groveling approach to God and an overriding preoccupation with getting to heaven[ROFL, you just can't make this stuff up!], rather than the Gospel emphasis upon discipleship, loving our neighbor and service. [I guess the Gospel cafeteria is open.]

Only antiquarians and Latin scholars (the people who made these changes) could love this turn of events.  [I do not know Latin and I like the changes.  I have heard a lot of people who like the changes and one person who didn't like consubstantial with the Father.  And I do know plenty of non-traditionalists.] I would advise Catholic people to turn for spiritual nourishment to the hymns we sing, where they shall find the scriptures and contemporary spirituality more readily available.  [He must be talking about this one.]

The new texts are cumbersome, wordy and difficult to pray publicly. [Don't worry, you can just use the Latin instead.] They shall not wear well, but look increasingly archaic with time[The Trinity is a pretty archaic as well], fostering the search for alternate prayers. [why did my foot just start tapping.  and with your spirrrrr ... Kum bay yaaaaaaaa....]  Unfortunately, the silk purse of our expensive new Roman Missal contains, when opened up, alas, a sow's ear.

Father Kenneth Smits, Capuchin
Fond du Lac
FDL Reporter

Check out Opinionated Catholic for more commentary.

I am re-reading Why Catholic Can't Sing right now and it is amazing how these folks fit the part exactly.  "Waste Not"  The book is a must read for any Catholic. 

9 comments:

  1. Unbelievable! Here's something that might make you feel better Matt:

    http://www.archmil.org/Bishops/Hying/Video-Files.htm

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  2. Thanks Anne! My computer is acting up right now but hopefully I can post this when I get a chance.

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  3. This priest is so close to Fr. Z - yet so far away. (They live in the same area - that's all.)

    Gosh - you can't make this stuff up though.

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  4. Gotta wonder what the problem is with making the English more like the missal we all used for hundreds of years with the English next to the Latin. I think they just should have dusted off an old missal and used that. It's almost identical to the changes.

    Pretty funny that some people don't warm to the idea that a translation shouldn't change the meaning of the text being translated.

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  5. I think the strangest thing about this letter is that whole thing he says about wanting to go to heaven vs. discipleship, loving our neighbor and service. Don't we want to do the latter in order to achieve the former? But, since we can't exactly be doing the latter during the time we're in Mass, shouldn't we be instead praying for the former so that we'll be inclined to do the latter?

    I dunno. Sounds pretty logical to me, but then I guess I'm just one of those dumb laypeople who would never be able to understand these changes...wait, what?

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  6. Father speaks about being a 'former professor of Liturgy' as if it were something to boast about. It is not.

    On the contrary, given the the track record of pride, hubris and outright lying by so many 'Liturgists' of his era, he ought to hang his head in shame and keep silent. We don't need more 'pseudo-Liturgists' pontificating on how we should worship.

    You were part of the problem Father, not part of the solution - and you're still part of the problem!

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  7. "Woe to you lawyers, for you have taken away the key of knowledge: you yourselves have not entered in, and those that were entering in, you have hindered."

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  8. "I would advise Catholic people to turn for spiritual nourishment to the hymns we sing, where they shall find the scriptures and contemporary spirituality more readily available."

    This priest is dishonest in lumping the scriptures and "contemporary spirituality" together. The contemporary spirituality he has in mind uses the scriptures very selectively. And, scriptural references are much more easily recognized within the new translation than the old. And, it's laughable how selective hymns we commonly hear are with scripture; case in point: Willard Jabusch's "Whatsoever you do to the least of my people" (formerly "Whatsoever you do to the least of my brothers"). The lyrics are from Matthew 25:35-36,40 which the heavenly king states as reasons as to why the sheep or the goats would be going to "eternal reward" (a.k.a. HEAVEN) or "eternal punishment" (a.k.a. HELL), yet nary a word in the hymn about going to heaven, let alone going to hell.

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  9. "I would advise Catholic people to turn for spiritual nourishment to the hymns we sing, where they shall find the scriptures and contemporary spirituality more readily available."

    This priest is dishonest in lumping the scriptures and "contemporary spirituality" together. The contemporary spirituality he has in mind uses the scriptures very selectively. And, scriptural references are much more easily recognized within the new translation than the old. And, it's laughable how selective hymns we commonly hear are with scripture; case in point: Willard Jabusch's "Whatsoever you do to the least of my people" (formerly "Whatsoever you do to the least of my brothers"). The lyrics are from Matthew 25:35-36,40 which the heavenly king states as reasons as to why the sheep or the goats would be going to "eternal reward" (a.k.a. HEAVEN) or "eternal punishment" (a.k.a. HELL), yet nary a word in the hymn about going to heaven, let alone going to hell.

    ReplyDelete