Friday, March 28, 2014

Yanke: Why I made the Jump…to the Greatest Parish in the Midwest

If you want to know what attracts people like Ben and I to a parish, he lays it out quite well in this recent post.  People like us like what the Church actually teaches on liturgy and music, something that the country club Catholics seem to strongly dislike. 

As many of you have already seen over at Facebook, I’ve recently switched parishes. I was previously a registered parishoner at the Cathedral Parish of St. Raphael, and I am grateful for the many good things that are happening there, but recently, after much prayer and discernment, I have come to the realization that St. Mary’s in Pine Bluff is an even better fit for me. I especially love they’re excellent implementation of Sacrosanctum Concilium, Musicam Sacram, and the rest of the church’s liturgical traditions. I love how there is an attitude of leadership, willing to lead the way in the Reform of the Reform in a plethora of ways that is rarely seen at other parishes at the extent to which you can find it here. In short, I love how they are blazing the trail, and leading the way, in faithful obedience.

Liturgy of the Hours

For years now, St. Mary’s has making public celebrations of the divine office more frequent (at least twice a week, often more), as well as encouraging it, and trying to incorporate it into the devotional life of the parish. Additionally, it is encouraged among the faithful (and practiced by many) that the office be prayed privately as well, at their own homes, which many do. It is also often incorporated into the parish events, including the monthly Knights of Divine Mercy meetings. It is almost always sung, not recited, and when possible, it is celebrated with additional solemnity, including a priest celebrant, incense, and even polyphony and organ.

Pastors of souls should see to it that the chief hours, especially Vespers, are celebrated in common in church on Sundays and the more solemn feasts. And the laity, too, are encouraged to recite the divine office, either with the priests, or among themselves, or even individually. (Sacrosanctum Concilium, §100)
continue at: http://blog.yankehome.com/index.php/moved-to-st-marys/#sthash.AzLlcK6Z.dpuf

9 comments:

  1. Can. 518 As a general rule a parish is to be territorial, that is, one which includes all the Christian faithful of a certain territory.

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  2. I don't understand why people don't stay in their home parish and try to improve the situation (if they believe there is a problem). If their spiritual needs are not being met in their territorial parish, have they talked with their pastor about the situation? We have an international priest in our parish...it is somewhat difficult to understand him...and people are leaving to attend Mass elsewhere. Is that right? Is our pastor being treated with dignity and respect? Are the people who are leaving being charitable? Is the Body of Christ being built up through their actions? Is parish shopping an appropriate activity for a Catholic to engage in?

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    1. I only speak for myself. I chose a Parish twenty miles from my home because I was seeking a Priest who was more traditional, and in a certain age bracket. I found one. What difference does it make anyway where you go, as long as you go. It's very probable that someone is comeing from outside the area I reside in to attend the Parish in my neighborhood. So it's all balancing out.

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  3. Seems like a contradiction, and maybe even blatant hypocrisy, when Church documents are quoted as justification for an action (and sometimes to criticize others), while, at the same time, canon law is being ignored. Be careful, the knife cuts both ways!

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  4. If the opposition is labeled country club Catholics, might one not just as much refer to some at St. Mary's as boutique parishioners?

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  5. LOL, this really struck a nerve!

    I would recommending discussing this at his place, but your anger is misplaced. The topic is what makes a Catholic parish attractive and desirable to young Catholics like us. I think the contrary position to this piece would be to find vibrant parishes who do not follow the liturgical traditions of the Church(I seriously believe there's probably some out there). I would recommend letting the Vicar General of the Diocese of Madison know of Mr. Yanke's truancy at once so that he can be interdicted. Seriously though, "As a general rule" - Yes, as a general rule. Certainly the tradition of territorial churches are there, we've discussed it out here many times, but let me ask this hypothetical, if a known sex offender is pastor at the local parish am I still required to bring my children there and attend services even after I have alerted the proper authorities?

    http://badgercatholic.blogspot.com/2012/10/guest-post-consumer-catholicism.html

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  6. Angry I am not. And certainly Ben's pursuit of holiness and spiritual nourishment are to be commended. My comments were not ad hominem in nature or in their intent. That being said, if I read your statement blindly (i.e., "I would recommend letting the Vicar General of the Diocese of Madison know of Mr. Yanke's truancy at once so that he can be interdicted"), I would think that a cafeteria leftist were being quoted, and not a faithful person like yourself. Such mockery and belittlement is often a tool used by those who don't want to see Vatican II faithfully implemented, and, thus, all the more relevant my warning that the knife can cut both ways.

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    1. Well I don't carry a knife and I'm not looking to stab anyone, maybe I'm just naive. A blessed Lent to you.

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    2. And On Wisconsin!

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