Friday, June 6, 2014

Abp. Listecki: "Our approach in the Arch. of Milwaukee is no different than the approach of other bishops in the State of Wisconsin"

Of the five parishes[I assume they mean dioceses... ] in the state of Wisconsin, the Archdiocese of Milwaukee is the only one to adopt Common Core.* The unusual move has led to speculation from some. Listecki insists that standards at the schools he oversees will not be changed by participating in Common Core.
[Abp. Listecki:] Our approach in the Archdiocese of Milwaukee is no different than the approach of other bishops in the State of Wisconsin, namely, that each of us has a strong commitment to Catholic identity, and that commitment shines through boldly in our Catholic schools… Common Core standards are a reference, not a replacement for Catholic school standards. We are not “adopting” Common Core, but rather utilizing those standards, along with our own Catholic school standards, as away of measuring the success of our students. 
The [arch]diocese addresses the controversy on its website, with a letter to parents, sample Common Core-aligned essays and questions and a list of what it calls Common Core "myths."

Define "approach"..... well I guess he does there.  Not sure that's really true, considering the fact the Archdiocese has repeatedly shut down "anti" Common Core talks from parish property.  

*So we dug into this a bit a while back: Wisconsin Catholic Common Core roundup

To be fair, we know for sure Madison and Green Bay are not using Common Core standards.  Superior I have not seen verified, and supposedly La Crosse was not adopting Common Core but the bishop has not confirmed this and ... well, I'm not sure anyone is convinced since parts have been implemented.  

... And with all the talk of is Common Core kosher for Catholics or not completely deflects the issue that the standards represent a completely untested replacement of good educational methods.  I don't think the issue with Common Core has absolutely anything to do with "Catholic identity" per se.  

I would recommend reading through the articles on the ArchMil website (http://schools.archmil.org/schools/Common-Core-Documents.htm).  They do address some of the concerns, the letter from Fr. Shimek is good, separatism, etc. (also important for homeschoolers to remember).  Unfortunately they still miss the ball again, I would recommend they reiterate.... or iterate perhaps the teaching of Vatican II: Declaration on Christian Education
Since parents have given children their life, they are bound by the most serious obligation to educate their offspring and therefore must be recognized as the primary and principal educators.  This role in education is so important that only with difficulty can it be supplied where it is lacking.
Yet don't forget this part.... 
The family which has the primary duty of imparting education needs help of the whole community. In addition, therefore, to the rights of parents and others to whom the parents entrust a share in the work of education, certain rights and duties belong indeed to civil society, whose role is to direct what is required for the common temporal good. Its function is to promote the education of youth in many ways, namely: to protect the duties and rights of parents and others who share in education and to give them aid; according to the principle of subsidiarity, when the endeavors of parents and other societies are lacking, to carry out the work of education in accordance with the wishes of the parents; and, moreover, as the common good demands, to build schools and institutions.
Of course where there is a lack of any acceptable school, homeschooling is certainly an option.

and.... eeek!
The Council also reminds Catholic parents of the duty of entrusting their children to Catholic schools wherever and whenever it is possible and of supporting these schools to the best of their ability and of cooperating with them for the education of their children.
 We'd have to caveat that with "in good conscience," since the document already declared parents as the primary educators.

HT acardnal

9 comments:

  1. Archbishop Listecki"s "commitment" to a "strong Catholic identity" is pretty thin on the ground though I don't blame him entirely for the fact that the Catholic schools of Milwaukee are anything but Catholic. He inherited the rotten fruits of Weakland and Dolan, true. But he has only continued their flawed policies which have driven so many Catholics to choose home schooling over the "Catholic" education offered by the archdiocese.

    For many decades Milwaukee's Catholic schools have for all intents and purposes ceased teaching Catholicism and one can find very little difference between an archdiocesan and a public school. If Archbishop Listecki is really and truly serious about reforming or improving the Catholic schools under his charge then he will have to do some wholesale house cleaning, and soon.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I second that Anonymous!

    ReplyDelete
  3. When people like Anthony Esolen harshly criticize the 'literature' component of those standards, someone ought to pay attention.

    If you think about it, "standards" determine the curriculum. Since CC's 'standards' are imposed by the Feds, the curriculum is also imposed by the Feds. One doesn't have to dislike the current President to be very chary of Federal mandates in anything.

    So. If the Catholic schools are, indeed, superior to the public schools, why should they adopt new 'standards' (and pay $umpty-millions for new books, etc.?

    Hmmm?

    ReplyDelete
  4. "The Council also reminds Catholic parents of the duty of entrusting their children to Catholic schools wherever and whenever it is possible..........."

    First, one would have to find a school that is actually Catholic before they could send them there............

    ReplyDelete
  5. I think you could also tie back to the principal of subsidiatiry regarding the education of children by the parents. Parents should allow the cooperation of others in the education of their children only when they feel it is an area where they themselves cannot meet the needs.

    This is the reason to send one's child to a Catholic school, but only after first looking at the authenticity of the Catholicism that permeates the school in all areas.

    This is why my children go to Aquinas Academy in Menomonee Falls.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Ah, Aquinas. The school seeking archdiocese aporoval without common core, while the rest of the Milwaukee parish schools will have common core shoved down their throats. Fair indeed.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Aquinas High School is a wonderful private school that provides a really great Catholic education to those that attend. I would highly recommend this school to anyone considering it. I recently wrote a research paper on the Catholic school advantage and why sending your child to a Catholic school is not only an important choice, but the best choice. I discuss why Catholic schools have an edge over public schools which include: academic achievements, school settings, and even combating the steep expenses that come with this incredible education. The four years I attended Aquinas High School I created some of my favorite memories and friends that I will cherish the rest of my life. As Dr. Seuss says, “Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.” Every child deserves the opportunity to be a part of something that means something. When I see my child graduate from high school I hope to look up and see them smiling as they receive that diploma, happy to have been a part of something so great.

    I have attached a link to the document if anyone would care to read. If you disagree or share an opinion, let me know! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. https://drive.google.com/a/slu.edu/file/d/0B9uGDhs6GIbUQXZlUDBJUTdPMEE/view?usp=sharing

      Delete
  8. Aquinas High School is a wonderful private school that provides a really great Catholic education to those that attend. I would highly recommend this school to anyone considering it. I recently wrote a research paper on the Catholic school advantage and why sending your child to a Catholic school is not only an important choice, but the best choice. I discuss why Catholic schools have an edge over public schools which include: academic achievements, school settings, and even combating the steep expenses that come with this incredible education. The four years I attended Aquinas High School I created some of my favorite memories and friends that I will cherish the rest of my life. As Dr. Seuss says, “Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.” Every child deserves the opportunity to be a part of something that means something. When I see my child graduate from high school I hope to look up and see them smiling as they receive that diploma, happy to have been a part of something so great.

    I have attached a link to the document if anyone would care to read. If you disagree or share an opinion, let me know! :)

    ReplyDelete

Please contact matt@badgercatholic.com if you have issues commenting.