Monday, December 23, 2013

Federal court upholds injunction blocking Wisconsin abortion law

A federal appeals court panel Friday upheld an injunction delaying Wisconsin's new law requiring abortion providers to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals, writing state attorneys failed to show implementing the law quickly would protect women's health.

The three-judge panel from the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago upheld U.S. District Judge William Conley's preliminary injunction. Judge Richard Posner wrote in a 25-page lead opinion that the law unreasonably gave providers just two days to obtain admitting privileges. Delaying the law's implementation shouldn't hurt because abortion complications are rare and nothing shows such privileges make any difference to a woman's health, he added.  [Tell that to Tonya Reaves, pictured right]

"The state can without harm to its legitimate interests wait a few months more to implement its new law, should it prevail in this litigation," Posner wrote.

The GOP-authored law requires abortion providers to have admitting privileges at hospitals within 30 miles. Nearly a dozen other states have similar laws. Wisconsin Republicans contend the law ensures continuity of care if a woman experiences complications following an abortion. Republican Gov. Scott Walker signed the law July 5, a Friday. Under Wisconsin statutes governing when laws become effective, the measure would have gone into effect July 8, the following Monday.
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Goes to show how utterly unreasonable abortion advocates have become. Would dentists fight like this if similar measures were taken?

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